The Journal of Philosophical Economics: Reflections on Economic and Social Issues

Search by keyword

  • Volume I Issue 1
    (Autumn 2007)
  • Volume I Issue 2
    (Special issue 2008)
  • Volume II Issue 1
    (Autumn 2008)
  • Volume II Issue 2
    (Spring 2009)
  • Volume III Issue 1
    (Autumn 2009)
  • Volume III Issue 2
    (Spring 2010)
  • Volume IV Issue 1
    (Special issue 2010)
  • Volume IV Issue 2
    (Spring 2011)
  • Volume V Issue 1
    (Autumn 2011)
  • Volume V Issue 2
    (Spring 2012)
  • Volume VI Issue 1
    (Autumn 2012)
  • Volume VI Issue 2
    (Spring 2013)
  • Volume VII Issue 1
    (Autumn 2013)
  • Volume VII Issue 2
    (Spring 2014)
  • Volume VIII Issue 1
    (Autumn 2014)
  • Volume VIII Issue 2
    (Spring 2015)
  • Volume IX Issue 1
    (Autumn 2015)
  • Volume IX Issue 2
    (Spring 2016)
  • Volume X Issue 1
    (Autumn 2016)
  • Volume X Issue 2
    (Spring 2017)
  • Volume XI Issue 1
    (Autumn 2017)
  • Volume XI Issue 2
    (Spring 2018)
  • Volume XII Issue 1
    (Autumn 2018)
  • Volume XII Issue 2
    (Spring 2019)
  • Volume XIII Issue 1
    (Autumn 2019)
  • Volume XIII Issue 2
    (Spring - Autumn 2020)
Kirsten FORD
Kirsten Ford is adjunct professors of economics at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City (USA)
ARTICLES
Because I said so: the persistence of mainstream policy advice (Nathaniel CLINE, Kirsten FORD, Matías VERNENGO)
Abstract: The current global crisis has shown the limitations of the mainstream approach. We trace the origins of the limitations of the dominant neoclassical views to the capital debates and to the rise to dominance of intertemporal general equilibrium. The limited use of the Arrow­Debreu model, which became dominant after the capital debates, in terms of policymaking, is central to understand the persistence of policy guided by the aggregative model. We use the International Monetary Fund (IMF) as a case study of this perplexing continuity of policy advice. Given our survey, we conclude that even though the economy is in the midst of the worst capitalist crisis since the Great Depression, a significant paradigmatic shift in economics is extraordinarily unlikely. [Volume III Issue 2 (Spring 2010)] Read the article ...
Unique visitors since September 15, 2013: 692.388 (2 today) Rosetti International Publishing House © 2007 - 2020