The Journal of Philosophical Economics: Reflections on Economic and Social Issues

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  • Volume I Issue 1
    (Autumn 2007)
  • Volume I Issue 2
    (Special issue 2008)
  • Volume II Issue 1
    (Autumn 2008)
  • Volume II Issue 2
    (Spring 2009)
  • Volume III Issue 1
    (Autumn 2009)
  • Volume III Issue 2
    (Spring 2010)
  • Volume IV Issue 1
    (Special issue 2010)
  • Volume IV Issue 2
    (Spring 2011)
  • Volume V Issue 1
    (Autumn 2011)
  • Volume V Issue 2
    (Spring 2012)
  • Volume VI Issue 1
    (Autumn 2012)
  • Volume VI Issue 2
    (Spring 2013)
  • Volume VII Issue 1
    (Autumn 2013)
  • Volume VII Issue 2
    (Spring 2014)
  • Volume VIII Issue 1
    (Autumn 2014)
  • Volume VIII Issue 2
    (Spring 2015)
  • Volume IX Issue 1
    (Autumn 2015)
  • Volume IX Issue 2
    (Spring 2016)
  • Volume X Issue 1
    (Autumn 2016)
  • Volume X Issue 2
    (Spring 2017)
  • Volume XI Issue 1
    (Autumn 2017)
  • Volume XI Issue 2
    (Spring 2018)
  • Volume XII Issue 1
    (Autumn 2018)
  • Volume XII Issue 2
    (Spring 2019)
  • Volume XIII Issue 1
    (Autumn 2019)
Soumitra SHARMA
Soumitra Sharma is Professor of Economics at the Jurje Dobrila University of Pula (Croatia) (soumitra-kumar.sharma@zg.htnet.hr)
ARTICLES
From a ‘Moral Philosopher’ to a ‘Poor’ Economist (Soumitra SHARMA)
Abstract: The roots of modern ‘Economics’ are deeply buried in the moral and political philosophy of the ancient philosophers. The journey of an economist from the pedestal of a ‘moral philosopher’ to a state of ‘poor economist’ is rather long. Through the Middle Ages the ‘natural law’ approach to economics and sociology held firm. The ‘socio-economic rationalism’ of the Stoics helped this approach to develop into a ‘social science’ that later took the form of ‘moral philosophy’ of the 18th century philosophers. Since then Economics has been enriched by scientific thought of many. While Marshall and his Principles made the study of Economics popular at universities, Keynes provided a theoretical platform to the governments for their full employment policies ensuring an unprecedented economic growth for a quarter century during the post-war years. For more than a century now Economics has witnessed tremendous progress in methods and contents. Unfortunately, over the last two decades it has come under fire. Is there a new transformation underway or Economics has lost its lustre? This short essay tries to address some of such issues. [Volume I Issue 1 (Autumn 2007)] Read the article ...
Some thoughts on ancient civilizations’ trinity of philosophy, religion and economics (Soumitra SHARMA)
Abstract: Here are some loud thoughts that reflect upon the relationship that had long existed amidst philosophy, religion and economics in the so-called ‘grand’ civilizations (that had existed during 3100 BC to the beginning of Christian era). Historically, the visions of intellectuals, rulers, men of faiths, and business people have helped drive these civilizations to their zenith. The philosophies, religions, and economics of the time were deeply involved in this process of development, and seem to have acted in unison. Here is an attempt to provoke some fresh thinking on the subject by re-examining this triad relationship of the fundamental spheres of human life. The logic of this paper attempts to raise doubts, if the relationship was ideal and was based on ethical and moral values, as it was proclaimed by the philosophers, pontiffs, politicians and the business leaders of the time. [Volume XI Issue 1 (Autumn 2017)] Read the article ...
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